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Chew #27

A comic review article by: Matthew Z. Rios
Chew is probably the most fun comic book on the stands right now. And speaking of “right now,” now is the time in my reviews where I have to defend something I say in order to make my point sound more fluid and less generic. So…

When I say fun, I mean fun. More often than not, someone will describe something as “fun” just so they don’t have to incur the public’s wrath when they say it was “bad” or “dumb.” Another way it can be used is when someone thinks something was good, but consider themselves too highbrow to admit they liked it. Nay on both these meanings. When I say Chew is fun, I mean that I actually have fun; that I really enjoy myself when I read it. This is because at the end of the day, Chew remembers that it is essentially and primarily a comic book.

This month, the book skips ahead 10 issues into the future, and we are left at issue # 27. Why? Because it’s funny. Anyway, this issue follows Tony’s adorable twin sister Antonelle as he rests in a hospital bed (whaaat?!). The rest of the plot points include: some revelations about Antonelle’s past, jokes about frog licking and the introduction of probably the funniest thing in the world: Psychedelic Chogs. Please take a second to imagine chubby half chicken/half frogs, covered in tie-dye colors. Yeah, it’s hilarious.

Once again, this issue was spot-on. I’m not sure if the series is going to continue from issue 27 and little by little, the info on the missing issues will trickle through, or if this was just a funny idea that will get back on track next month. Either way, it doesn’t matter. It was a clever way to flesh out Antonelle Chew a bit more and delve into her day to day life. Her NASA scientist duties (also including special agent crackdown situations) were good-humored and fun. With three trades and several issues under his belt, writer John Layman continues threading along the same unique and light-hearted tones he has been since issue one. His unique vision really makes for one great read, month after month.

Every time I open this book up, I can always expect several things from Rob Guillory’s artwork: funny looking animals, great character expressions, hidden little pictures and notes in the background and girls with huge boobs. And guess what I love? All of those things (and especially the boob one). A book like Chew has to have art that matches the same quirky feel, and Guillory is the perfect fit. There’s just something about his style that always has me sitting back, slowly studying each panel for detail. The feel of the art is both accessible and inviting, much like your favorite cartoon.

It’s funny how much I love this book, since I initially hated it. I have no idea why, either. I think it could be that I wasn’t expecting such a non-sequitur book that did whatever it wanted. As I stated before, this is a COMIC BOOK, where writers and artists can make think up whatever they want and make it happen. And as long as it stays within the boundaries it’s created, it’s all good. I really applaud Layman and Guillory for Chew: truly the most entertaining and unique book sold in comic shops.

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