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Scooby-Doo #130

Posted: Friday, March 21, 2008
By: Ray Tate

Various
Various
DC Comics
Four stories piece together the clues for Mystery Inc. Only one tale a flawless endeavor. The writing damages the diamonds that may have been, and while you can roll your eyes in the defense that this is just Scooby-Doo, each issue I feel must meet as high a standard as any other comic book.

John Rozum's "Rokuro-Kubi" is the best of the lot. Rozum informs the reader, including this one, about an unusual monster from Japan and does so in a voice that echoes the tones of Velma. He tops the story off with a superb Shaggy and Scooby joke. Scott Gross, Jorge Pacheco and Heroic Age capture the divine weirdness of the Rokuro-Kubi and brings a lot of character to Velma's poses.

The first tale by Keith Champagne moves along swimmingly and while the careful reader can deduce the nature of this particular monster, the otherwise perfect story is hamstrung by an additional explanation that's completely unnecessary and contradictory to what's seen in the panels. Those panels by Scott Neely are perfectly laid out and filled with cute extras. El-Chup differs strongly from the reports given alleged eyewitnesses of the legendary goat-sucker. In Scooby-Doo, he looks like an Aztec werewolf, but given the mystery, the appearance of El-Chup is immaterial.

Terrence Griep adds a little spice to "Worse than a Curse" through his dialogue for the Gang who look splendid in Karen Matchette's slightly askew style. The trouble is that the mystery is too easy to solve and the ghost isn't all that spectral.

"Surreal Cereal Spook" by Robbie Busch, Jaime Garcia Corral and Conchita Mas Fentes has the same problem as "Worse than a Curse". The spook's unimpressive. More to the point there's no explanation as to how the perpetrator of the crime can perform the spooky things, such as floating. No clues lead Scooby and the Gang in the right direction. The motive behind the crime is a good one, but this story really needed more time to grow.



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