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Witch Doctor #3 (Ray's Review)

A comic review article by: Ray Tate
Vincent Morrow the Witch Doctor reports to an occult licensing board and relates the details of his most recent case: the Fish Man captured by Absinthe O'Riley, the Witch Doctor's River Song. The current issue of Witch Doctor offers an interesting interpretation of the Deep Ones, legendary Cthulhu disciples, created by of course H.P. Lovecraft in the short story "The Shadow Over Innsmouth." Along the way, we discover a decidedly alien origin for life on this planet, Penny Dreadful's unusual nature, which is filled with black comedy and the mettle of the good doctor's sword. HINT: he pulled it from a stone.



It turns out this decidedly singular action set up the Witch Doctor as the M.D. for the Apocalypse. In yet another way, writer Brandon Seifert takes an idea from Doctor Who and reduces it to components that he refits to create a fresh outlook.



The Doctor wanted nothing more to explore. Oh, he was glad to defeat the occasional Dalek invasion, but his people the Time Lords frequently threw him as a spanner in major works, often because they didn't "want to dirty their lily white hands!"



The Witch Doctor would like nothing more but to learn about the wondrous creatures that nature spurts out, but drawing the sword met the needs of a prophecy, and now he's got a heavy destiny weighing upon his skinny shouldrs.



Artists Luke Ketner, Sunny Gho and Andy Troy combine their methods for an illustrious tapestry of medical and mystical mayhem. The creatures are misshapen nightmares that would make Lovecraft grin like a maniac. The human characters have an Ichabod Crane delicacy to them, contrasted by the Witch Doctor's large, normal protégé Gast, the Bram Bones of the visual. The story also benefits from Ketner's comic timing to deliver excellent punchlines, ranging from the surprising number of Deep Ones to Penny's want for lunch and in one laugh out loud scene her absolute obedience to the Witch Doctor.

Danny Djeljosevic also reviewed Witch Doctor #3. Read his thoughts, too!


Ray Tate's first online work appeared in 1994 for Knotted. He has had a short story, "Spider Without a Web," published in 1995 for the magazine evernight and earned a degree in biology from the University of Pittsburgh. Since 1995, Ray self-published The Pick of the Brown Bag on various usenet groups. In the POBB, as it was affectionately known, Ray reviewed comic books, Doctor Who novels, movies and occasionally music. Circa 2000, he contributed his reviews to Silver Bullet Comic Books (later Comics Bulletin) and became its senior reviewer. Ray Tate would like to think that he's young at heart. Of course, we all know better.

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