Current Reviews

subheader

Scooby Doo #122

Posted: Saturday, July 21, 2007
By: Ray Tate



"Let Liberty Scream"
"What Are You Afraid Of?"
"Museum Mayhem"

Writer: Various
Artists: Various
Publisher: DC

"Zoinks!" It's a fright-filled Fourth of July celebration in Scooby-Doo.

The first story by Scott Cunningham tours the Gang to Philly for a viewing of the Liberty Bell. Before you can say "let freedom ring" Cunningham and strikingly on-model artists Scott Jeralds and Dan Davis meet up with a spirited period ghost. The mystery's undemanding as is the maze, but it's fun, especially when peppered by Scooby's and Shaggy's gags which illicit some choice lines from Fred.

The first story team returns for an oddly out of place vignette with Velma chatting about phobias and unwittingly scaring Shaggy and Scooby back to ghost-breaking. It's a bizarre and complex little comedy skit played to the artistic hilt.

An enigma can be found in Darryl Taylor's and Kravitz Doth's musuem piece. The story's short, and the identity of the villain isn't a mystery, but Taylor's and Doth's characterization of Mystery Inc. gives the short its punch. Robert Pope and Scott McCrae are on hand to keep everyone on their best artistic behavior and add detail to Egyptian backdrops as well as technological spookery.

Between the main features, Sholly Fisch takes a page from Ellery Queen and keeps the solution to two how-dunnits close to the vest until the very last. His Benjamin Franklin puzzle is easy-peasy for the historically minded, and careful observation will unveil the baker's doozy.

Jorge Pachceo accompanies him on these brief tales and animates the Gang with incredible skill despite that he only has perhaps two pages to capture their personalities and body language.

The quality and quantity of the tales in Scooby-Doo make this book and in particular this issue a worthy addition to your collection.



What did you think of this book?
Have your say at the Line of Fire Forum!