Current Reviews

subheader

Nightwing #129

Posted: Monday, February 12, 2007
By: Bruce Logan



"Bride & Groom (Part 1: The Courtship)"

Writer: Marv Wolfman
Artists: Jamal Igle (p), Keith Champagne (i)

Publisher: DC Comics


Okay, this is it. Get me that Super-Punching-Boy Prime. Get him this very instant. Right. Now. Not for Dick Grayson or even Nightwing. Those two seem to have recovered (although not fully) from the never ending abyss that Devin Grayson and Bruce Jones had seemingly pushed him into. Not for the supporting characters, who although not of Clancy caliber seem to be coming along quite well. Not even for the villains of this arc, although not particularly interesting, even they seem to have a certain promise that just might reach positive fruition. The reason I am asking, no, begging (it's come to that) for Superboy Prime is to not punch through any "reality" walls but rather to break down the dork-fortress that DC has and is still erecting around the Batman. Come one guys, I understand that one of the biggies of Infinite Crisis was to make the Dark Knight into the Not-So-Dark Knight. I understand that, and to a certain extent I even expect (even if not completely accept) it. However, what I donít expect or will ever accept is a change from the Dark Knight into the Dork Knight (hence the "dork-fortress" and my requisitioning some sooper-dooper prime punches).

The NOT Bruce Wayne (his party and his extremely flip-floppy behavior) aside, there is a lot going on in this setup issue to this new arc. Even though we get to see the villainous duo, what we learn about them is nothing compared to the shawl of mystery woven around them. Immortal meta or reincarnated, the groom, Thomas is the one we start to become interested in, and maybe it is just because we got to see more of him than the bride that he is the more interesting. As for the bride, she reminded me of a more assertive Harley Quinn, just as crazy (maybe even more so) but with more confidence.

As for Dick, carrying on with the characters introduced in his first arc, writer Marv Wolfman gets everyone involved, from Ryan, the friendly masseur to Dahlia, the Raptorís widow. Not only that, we also get to meet a couple of new people by way of Phillip (Raptorís eldest son), Father Benjamin Ortega and Dennis, the "bouncer." As with the other non-costumed characters, thanks to Marvís deft handling, these two also interest from the get go.

Lastly, the art. Having finished his run on the soon to end Firestorm, artist Jamal Igle takes up the penciling duties of the Ďwingster, and although there were a few rough spots as far as openers go, Nightwing #129 turned out to be quite impressive. In addition, thanks to the Hories continuing on the colors, there isnít all much of a departure in the feel of the characters, their surroundings and the overall visual experience.

Conclusion: Nightwing, as with Tim Drake (Robin) is off to a good start here, but with One Year Later, DC has done a shoddy job of properly handling their Pre-IC past, shadowing (if not outright neglecting) it in favor of the so called "fresh start."

You can find more reviews by Bruce Logan at www.xcave.net



What did you think of this book?
Have your say at the Line of Fire Forum!