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Simpsons/Futurama Crisis Crossover II #2

Posted: Saturday, March 26, 2005
By: Ray Tate



Writer: Ian Boothby
Artists: James Lloyd(p), Steve Steere Jr.(i), Rick Reese(c)
Publisher: Bongo

The Simpsons/Futurama Crossover Crisis is a "bwa-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha" fest. The people of the future decided to take advantage of the Professor's invention that pulled Springfield out of the comic book pages. They turned them into slaves. The denizens of Futurama then assumed the same could be done to every other literary character. Of course, their plans backfired, and we now join the war between literature and the "real" already in progress.

Boothby does not just set off joke bombs that spread laughter per panel. He also comes up with a smart plot. A literary character takes over the Mayoral position, and his usurpation of the political throne makes perfect sense. Smithers actions at first surprising become explained in the dialogue. His total confidence in Mr. Burns fits his character.

When the cover problem appears--and you would be surprised at how to the model the Homer Beast is to the Amazing Colossal Beast--Boothby's solution to dispensing him cunningly uses one of Futurama's opening sight gags as well as the very fiber of Homer's characterization. As does Bart's previous betrayal and Lisa's ability to adapt to Bart's mischief-making.

James Lloyd and Steve Steere and Rik Reese have the unenviable task to not only detail the extensive cast of both television series but also embody the characters of literature. Sometime in one big panel. They never miss a beat, and some of their artwork rivals, often surpassing, that seen in the unfunny books. Lloyd's Batman for instance in Steere's shadows and Reese's vivid indigo looks more like the real thing than that hypermuscular short-eared thing brooding in the so-called continuity-books at DC.

Impressive artistically and humorous on every page, Simpsons/Futurama: Crossover Crisis lives up to the promise that many crossovers fail to deliver.



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